Author: jamaica

Measuring Leadership for Social Change

The Packard Foundation believes in supporting and investing in leaders who are at the heart of organizations and movements in order to strengthen a given field or system. After all, people power the programs, strategies, campaigns, and networks working toward social change in our world. While investments in leadership development have hovered at 1 percent…

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Developing tomorrow’s leaders: Our approach to building leadership capacity

Organizational Effectiveness (OE) at the Packard Foundation has long invested in building the capacity of leaders. In recent years we have seen increased demand for leadership investments from our grantee partners and our program colleagues, who see this kind of support in a given sector or movement as a critical piece of creating lasting impact….

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Capacity Building on a Large Scale: How Can We Support Movement Builders and Leaders?

First, organizations, then networks, now movements… Many of us in the capacity building sector started our work focused primarily or exclusively on strengthening organizations. At first, borrowing from the best practices of the business world, we developed business plans, performance management systems, and financial metrics. Over time, a nonprofit capacity building sector emerged and matured,…

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Defining Capacity Building Around the World

The OE Program at the Packard Foundation supports leaders, networks, and organizations around the world. From Ethiopia to China, and many countries in-between, we operate under the same theory of change – that organizations and networks with stronger leadership, management, and operations are better equipped to achieve their missions. However, just as language, culture, and…

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Three Keys to Unlocking Systems-Level Change

Developing a systems mindset, identifying the right tool for the job, and paying attention to human dynamics can help leaders move from theory to action when facing complex social problems.

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